Canku Ota logo

Canku Ota

Canku Ota logo

(Many Paths)

An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

 

November 16, 2002 - Issue 74

 
 

pictograph divider

 
     
 

"Ka-Hay. Sho'o Daa' Chi"

 
 

The Crow Greeting

 
 

Means “Hello”

 
 

Tom Turkey

 
     
 

"Pne'kesis"

 
 
THE MOnth of the Turkey and Feast
 
 

POTAWATOMI

 
 

pictograph divider

 

"In our story of Creation, we talk about each one of us having our own path to travel, and our own gift to give and to share. You see, what we say is that the Creator gave us all special gifts; each one of us is special. And each one of us is a special gift to each other because we've got something to share."

John Peters (Slow Turtle), WAMPANOAG

 

pictograph divider

 

We Salute
Phil Konstantin

Phil Konstantin, the officer known throughout San Diego County for his California Highway Patrol traffic reports, has a new book out titled, "This Day in North American Indian History," now being sold by DaCapo Press in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

The book reflects Konstantin's pride in his Cherokee Indian heritage, and writing it was a scholarly endeavor for a man known for having a serious funny bone.

"I was always kind of cheering for the Indians at the movies," Konstantin said, smiling during an interview at his Clairemont home.

Read More Button

 

School News Banner
The information here will include items of interest for and about Native American schools. If you have news to share, please let us know! I can be reached by emailing: [email protected]

Read More

"Native Heroes" Essay Contest Announced!
Winners to be announced in the January 4 issue
Read More
 
We have an entry!!!
Use your browser's "back" button to return here

Artist:
Daphne Odjig

Celebrated artist Daphne Odjig was born in 1919 on the Wikwemikong Reserve, Manitoulin Island. Her heritage is a combination of Odawa, Potawatomi and English roots, the Native aspects of which were revealed to Odjig as a child on sketching excursions with her grandfather. From him, a stone-carver, she learned not only the legends of her ancestors, but also the use of curvilinear design for which she has become so well known.

 

Brain Food
by Lazorletter

The fall colors have come and almost gone, and Mother Earth is preparing for its winter sleep. The air is filled with a chill and on the few remaining sunny days I rejoice in its warmth. Snow has fallen but was quickly chased away, while Mother Earth hangs on to just a few more days of warmth. I love the sound of the leaves as they crunch when you step on them, and I must admit that I am looking forward to spending days looking out the window over morning coffee and marveling in the beauty of the winter.

Read More

 

Read More

     

Thunderhawk - Cowrate - Ancient Art of the Bovine's - Conclusion
by Geoff Hampton

Writer Geoff Hampton shares this story that should delight both young and old.

 

National American Indian Heritage Month, 2002
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

News and Views Banner

Reservations Battle More Gang Activity
by Dorreen Yellow Bird

No matter how I try to spin the notion that gangs on reservations are nearly harmless, I am wrong. Gang problems are affecting the lives of not only the young people and families in urban Indian communities, but on reservations too.

A recent article, “Gang activity thrives on reservations,” seemed unbelievable to me.

 

Brother Eagle
by Richard Slater

Here is a true story. It happened several years ago while I was working in Idaho.

I was driving to Boise, ID to finish a consultation job with a group of sugar refineries, located in southern Idaho. I had left home early that morning and was in the hills south of Nampa, ID when I first saw it. Sitting along the highway, an adult Golden eagle, dark brown feathers down its sides and wings, shiny gold colored feathers along its face.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

Caring Award Will Go to Navajo 'Santa'

After helplessly watching a child die 23 years ago, Kenneth Maryboy made a promise to himself — and to the children of his tribe.

"I never want to see an unhappy child on Christmas," he vowed, even though many of his fellow Navajos knew little about how the holiday was celebrated outside the reservation. Maryboy, then an 18-year-old construction worker living in rural southeastern Utah, had hitched a ride with an elderly woman to the town of Bluff. As they drove in, a child ran in front of the car, the woman was unable to steer clear and the child died soon after being struck.

Maryboy, now 41, has since become a Navajo medicine man — and he is also a Navajo Santa Claus, who brings gifts to hundreds of children in remote corners of the reservation's 1.1 million-acre Utah strip. He has spent 14 Christmas Eves decked out in red suit, white beard and shiny black boots.

 

My Small Role as A Nez Perce Indian
by Roscoe Pond

It has been one hundred and twenty five years since the Nez Perce War of 1877. Since then, the Plight of the Nez Perce and Young Chief Joseph has been written about in countless books, novels and news articles.

Documentaries have been made and a popular 1970's ABC movie was produced called, "I will fight no more forever". Chief Joseph has been revered by historians and overly idolized by non-Indians alike with their Internet websites. Like Sitting Bull, Geronimo and Crazy Horse, Young Chief Joseph has become imbedded into the conscious of all those who have followed him or didn't. But, to his own descendents he was an ordinary man who only wanted the survival of his people.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

USM, Choctaws Agree to Boost Indian Enrollment

Hattiesburg, MS - The leaders of the University of Southern Mississippi and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians exchanged gifts Wednesday to mark the beginning of an effort to bring more Choctaw students to USM.

"The Choctaws in Mississippi are making a lot of progress in a short time," Chief Phillip Martin said. "We are interested in working with anybody who will work with us for social and economic improvement opportunities."

 

'In-Your-Face College' Spurs Native Students

Juneau, AK - Tlingit ancestors paddling cedar canoes off the shores of Auke Village did not greet each other with the phrase "What's up, dawg?"

But at least 30 Tlingit teenagers in Juneau can rattle off that and two dozen traditional phrases in Tlingit, thanks to a language and culture class they attend weekly as part of the Early Scholars program.

The program for Alaska Native students has been at Juneau-Douglas High School for eight years. It was started by school counselor Frank Coenraad.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

Federal Grant Boosts UAF Teaching of Yup'ik

As a child growing up in the Yup'ik village of Emmonak, Walkie Charles struggled to get his head around the English language.

Today, Charles demonstrates his grasp of English as an instructor at the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

And now he's celebrating a $1 million grant he helped obtain that is aimed at strengthening Yup'ik-language education in classrooms in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

 

Bladder Dance

An ancient tradition that all but vanished from the seal-hunting villages of Western Alaska for more than 50 years returned to life Saturday in Anchorage.

Dancers from Toksook Bay reincarnated a few brief excerpts from the Yup'ik bladder festival on the stage of the Alaska Native Heritage Center.

Seal-hunting Yup'ik villages once performed the festival every hunting season to honor the animal that provided them with meat, oil and spiritual strength.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

Bridge to the Past

Mythic 10,000-year-old tradition of netting salmon is being kept alive by the Indians along the Klickitat River in Washington

LYLE FALLS, WA - In a hidden canyon of the Klickitat River, a half-dozen Indian men observe a 10,000-year-old tradition, dipping long-handled nets into the water, in search of salmon.

They learned the old ways from their fathers, who learned from their fathers. To come here, the men explain, is to honor those who came before. To bring their sons here, they say, is to honor those yet to come.

 

 

Washington Tribes Invest Casino Proceeds by Sending Members to College

MUCKLESHOOT INDIAN RESERVATION, WA - Having never made it past the eighth grade, Cathleen Schultz wanted more for her daughter. It wasn't a question of if Denise would go to college, but when, her mother would say over and over.

But neither imagined Denise would go so far.

Denise Dillon is the first in her family to go to college and the first in her tribe to earn advanced degrees from major East Coast universities.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

Native American Celebration Features Music, Dance, Memories

HELENA, MT – The Calling Mountain drummers bide their time in the corner of the Holter Museum of Art, seated around a single cask as though it were a campfire.

With his long black hair and steady hand, Shawn Buffalo joins the drumming clan, and the tempo swells. Slowly, methodically, the pounding fills the hall. Boom, boom, boom, and the dancers stir.

 

Maori Language Enjoys Resurgence

ELEANOR HALL: Two decades ago it was written off as a dying language.

But now Maori is not only spoken fluently by at least a quarter of New Zealand's indigenous population, but many non-Maori New Zealanders can also hold a basic conversation in the country's native tongue.

Indeed, a report into the language by the New Zealand Government shows Maori is spoken by more than 130,000 New Zealanders.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

For Tribes, Bringing Back Buffalo a Labor of Love

CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX RESERVATION, S.D. -- "As a child sitting at his grandmother's knee 45 years ago, Rick Williams was spellbound by prophecies about the return of the buffalo to the vast grasslands they once roamed.

"Some day, the buffalo will come back, coming out of the water and the mist," the old woman -- half Lakota, half Northern Cheyenne -- told the boy. "And when they do, the Indian people will be whole again."

 

S.D. Vet to Perform Lakota Ceremony at Vietnam Wall Memorial

PIERRE, SD - Francis Whitebird, a member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and former combat medic, will perform a Lakota centering ceremony as part of the 20-year anniversary of the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall on Thursday.

Whitebird, chairman of Lakota studies at Lower Brule Community College, said he was asked to perform the ceremony to open the observances that mark two decades from the time the wall was unveiled on the mall in Washington, D.C.

Read More

 

Read More

     

pictograph divider

 

In Every Issue Banner

About This Issue's Greeting - "Ka-Hay. Sho'o Daa' Chi"

 

In traditional and contemporary Crow culture, it is customary to greet each other with a quick glance away or a blink and nod of the head. If they are wearing a hat, they might tip the brim of the hat. Handshaking is a white man's custom and was only recently accepted as a greeting in Crow culture. You will rarely see Crow people embracing publicly.

 

This Date In History

 

Recipe: Veggie Dishes for Diabetics

Read More

 

Read More

Story: How Rabbit Fooled Wolf

 

What is this: Gray (Timber) Wolf

Read More

 

Read More

This Issue's Web sites

Read More

     

Opportunities

"OPPORTUNITIES" is gathered from sources distributed nationally and includes scholarships, grants, internships, fellowships, and career opportunities as well as announcements for conferences, workshops and symposia.

Read More

pictograph divider

     

Home ButtonFront Page ButtonArchives ButtonOur Awards ButtonAbout Us Button

Kids Page ButtonColoring Book ButtonCool Kids ButtonGuest Book ButtonEmail Us Button

     
 

pictograph divider

 
  Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.  
     
 

Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002 of Vicki Lockard and Paul Barry.

 

Canku Ota logo

 

Canku Ota logo

The "Canku Ota - A Newsletter Celebrating Native America" web site and its design is the

Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 of Paul C. Barry.

All Rights Reserved.


Thank You

Valid HTML 4.01!