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Canku Ota

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(Many Paths)

An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

 

April 19, 2003 - Issue 85

 
 

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"Aang"

 
 

The Aleut Greeting

 
 

Means "Greetings"

 
 

Trailmix

 
 

"nvda atsilusgi"

 
 

Flower Moon
(when plants come to life and bloom again and the Earth is renewed)

 
 

Eastern Cherokee

 
 

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"A step back to Tradition, is a step forward" - Unknown

 

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We Salute
Lori Piestewa

TUBA CITY - As the Aztec Dancers of Phoenix blew mournfully into their wind instruments and incense wafted into the air, the crowd of 5,000 at the memorial service drew tearfully silent.

Their native daughter, Army Pfc. Lori Piestewa, was finally home, buried only hours earlier in private services across U.S. 160 in the traditional Hopi community of Moenkopi. It was a day short of three weeks of heart-wrenching sorrow since Piestewa became what is believed to be the first Native American woman in the military killed in combat on foreign soil, after her unit was ambushed in southern Iraq.

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Our Featured Artist:

Health and Wellness

Mary Louise Defender Wilson

"History is always there -- you're standing there dragging all these things behind you." At least two lessons might be drawn from this saying. First, each of us is in part a composite of our past -- the family members who influenced us, our culture, our environment -- and some of our greatest treasures are our memories and the lessons they hold for us. Second, we should keep in mind that the past we create now will be our most important legacy for our children to "drag behind them."

 

Moment of Truth - Fitness
by Geoff Hampton

At a recent conference on Childhood Obesity held in sunny San Diego, Dr. Richard Carmona, The U.S. Surgeon General declared that the catastrophic state of obesity in our nation is now so severe that it actually represents a "threat to national security". If that doesn't wake people up, then nothing ever will. He went on to say that the devastating effects of obesity have now surpassed even that of smoking to become the number one cause of preventable death in the United States. This is a national crisis.

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Thunderhawk - Our Featured Story:

Northwestern Wisconsin First Person History:

Thunderhawk - The Great Cross Country Adventure - Part 8
by Geoff Hampton

Happy Mouse

Writer Geoff Hampton shares this story that should delight both young and old.

 

Interesting Sidelights on the History of the Early Fur Trade Industry (part 3)
submitted by Timm Severud (Ondamitag)

The talk given by W.W. Bartlett at the gathering of Chippewa Valley Historical Society at the Ermatinger place at Jim Falls on Saturday (June 10, 1925) on early fur trading in this section of the state was a great revelation to those present and provided his listeners with much that was new and interesting in connection with the early history of this section.

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The Center for Disease Control Needs You!!

There is much work to be done to increase the numbers of American Indian/Alaska Natives in health and public health professions and there really is a lot of work to be done in getting some of those aspiring professionals here to CDC. In that it has been determined that a lot of what is hurting Indian country to a large degree is related to the quite apparent health disparities and public health issues present in native communities, not enough can be said about the need of native people to assist the premiere public health agency in developing and becoming more cultural competent and able to serve those communities. A few more native people are very much needed to join the team and students definitely can and need to be part of that sphere of influence.

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School News Banner
The information here will include items of interest for and about Native American schools. If you have news to share, please let us know! I can be reached by emailing: [email protected]

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News and Views Banner

Wisconsin First Person History

UPDATE!!

Indians Are Very Bitter
submitted by Timm Severud (Ondamitag)

Here is a collection of four articles from Superior, WI and Duluth, MN newspapers from 1914. As you will see, they report an issue that continues to cause concern. Sadly, we suspect we know the outcome in this case.

 

Ojibwe band may regain Ancestors' Burial Ground

Nearly 90 years after their forebears were evicted from Wisconsin Point, Ojibwe Indians may regain control over a small part of the land.

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Basketball Champions

Basketball Champions

Sequoyah Claim Basketball Championship

For the first time in its illustrious history, Sequoyah Indian High School located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma brought home a State Basketball Championship. On March fifteenth at the State Fairgrounds Area in Oklahoma City the Sequoyah Indians defeated Metro Christian of Tulsa, 58 to 47 to claim this year’s Oklahoma class 3A Championship.

 

Anadarko Warriors Take State

The Anadarko Warriors became the Champions of Class 4A High School Basketball when they defeated Piedmont by a score of seventy-four to sixty-seven.

Andarko High School has a long and successful history in High School Basketball, but it has been 28 years since they have proudly hoisted a State Championship Trophy in the air.

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Art Exhibit News

Art Exhibit News

New Generation of Artists

PHOENIX - A Heard Museum tradition for 13 years and one of the largest art shows in the country dedicated to Native youth, the Student Art Show & Sale held April 5-9 included more than 1,700 works of young Native artists across North America. The annual show provided American Indian students not only with the opportunity to explore a variety of creative processes, but also the chance to market and sell their artwork, both valuable lessons on the road toward professional artist status. For many, it was an important step in developing self-confidence in their artistic abilities. For others, the show helped open the door to a career in art.

 

A Family Affair

Cape Dorset artist Pitseolak Ashoona loved to draw. Born in 1904, she is one of the community's most famous early graphic artists.

Ashoona, who passed away in 1983, and four of her family members are being celebrated in a Toronto art exhibition this month, called Women of the Ashoona Family: Inuit Print Retrospective.

Ann Tompkins, the Guild Shop's Inuit and native gallery director, says she's always been interested in families. All the gallery's shows this season are family oriented.

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Honoring Service To The Community

Honoring The Past

Native American Activist to receive Honorary PSU Degree

Portland State University announced it has selected Kathryn Harrison to receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters to be given at the 2003 commencement ceremony held in July.

Harrison, a Sheridan resident, will be awarded this honor based on her outstanding accomplishments and her ongoing service to public policy in the community.

 

Massacre Site gets Long-delayed Blessing

Waving a brown feather, Shoshone Ricky Hasuse blessed the site Monday where at least 250 members of his tribe were slaughtered by U.S. soldiers 140 years ago.

Hasuse blessed the land first in the tribe's native language as many of the Shoshone attending the ceremony wiped tears from their eyes. He later asked in English for the "Great Creator" to bless massacre victims.

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Traditions

Traditions

Annual Feast of Aboriginal Food lets Indians Return to their Roots

KELLER, Colville Indian Reservation - As long as these sage-covered hills have bloomed with balsamroot and salmon have come back to the great Columbia River in the spring, there have been root feasts to celebrate the new harvest year.

 

Walking In The Sand

On a hot summer day on the beach at Makah, I was Walking In The Sand along the shore admiring the splendors of the twenty or so giant cedar canoes that were lined up side by side on the beach. The beauty and boldness of these traditional ocean-going canoes overcame my senses until I heard my name being called. As I turned to see someone who is a very special person to me, I realized the beauty of the canoes and the beauty of my friend had made my heart feel really good and that I am a proud Human Being.

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Wisconsin First Person History

Wisconsin First Person History

Fair Treatment Denied Indians
submitted by Timm Severud (Ondamitag)

'Although Presidents Pierce and Grant both promised my father the Indians would always be taken care of they have not been treated as they should have been,' said Chief Pitawash of the Chippewa Tribe his morning. The chief is visiting Superior for a few days before leaving as the head of Indian delegation to Washington to look after Indian rights.

 

Michel Cadotte Buried on Madeline Island
submitted by Timm Severud (Ondamitag)

You will find his grave in an abandoned Indian Cemetery alongside the winding road, which leads from the present village of La Pointe to the Old Fort or Old Mission Settlement. The little cemetery is terribly neglected, for the immediate kin of those whose bodies lie there have passed to the common fate and there are no loving hands to quell the weeds and rank grass which grow abundantly over the abiding places of the dead.

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Students and Elders

Student News

Shiprock Students, Elders Team Up

Shiprock High School was chosen by the Environmental Protection Agency to host an Environmental Alliance for Senior Involvement pilot program. Only two other sites in the country were chosen in Montana and Philadelphia.

The program brought Shiprock science students from Rick Espinoza's class and Navajo elders together to teach environmental subjects to Eva B. Stokley Elementary School pupils. The project put the high school students who had to master their subjects in leadership roles because they became teachers to a younger generation.

 

Maxton Woman Crowned Miss Indian North Carolina

Shelly Strickland, 21, of Maxton was crowned 2003 Miss Indian North Carolina at the 28th Annual United Tribes of North Carolina Unity Conference.

Strickland is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Strickland. She currently is a senior at North Carolina State University and is a double major in Biomedical and Biological Engineering.

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Traditions

Food For Thought

New Wildlife Bill built on Inuktitut Principles

Nunavut’s proposed new wildlife act, Bill 35, builds on a solid Inuit base, encoding a set of Inuktitut concepts and principles to ensure the law is applied in ways that are consistent with Inuit culture.

 

Brain Food

The sun is shinning brightly here in the land of 10 thousand lakes, bringing with it the welcome promise of spring. It was indeed a strange winter that kept everyone guessing. The mild temperatures followed by bitter cold provided me with perfect conditions to keep a constant red nose.

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Youth Sports

Artist

Tribal Youth Sought for Martial Arts Drive

KICK International, announced its new Youth Development Drive today in St. Louis, Missouri. The Drive is designed to recruit members from rural areas and American Indian tribal lands in order to develop martial arts programs for young people to participate in after school.

 

Pow-wow Poster Artist Draws Inspiration from His Past

Beside the stove in a one-cook kitchen, Ken Morsette sets up his easel and paints.

The 32-year-old Chippewa Cree from Rocky Boy Indian Reservation near Havre first picked up a paint brush at 17, encouraged by a high school teacher that often let him skip classes to paint.

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In Every Issue Banner

About This Issue's Greeting - "Aang"

Aleut is the only language of the Aleut branch of Eskaleut language family.

Aleut is spoken both in Russia (the Commodore Isles) and in the USA (the Aleutian Isles and the Pribilov Isles). There are about 700 Aleuts in Russia (190 of them can speak Aleut), and about 2100 — 5000 Aleuts in the USA, according to different researchers. Only 525 Aleuts in the USA are native speakers of Aleut.

This Date In History

 

Recipe: Breads

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Story: The Coyote and the Locust

 

What is this: Locusts

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Craft Project: Nylon Kite

 
This Issue's Web sites

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Opportunities

"OPPORTUNITIES" is gathered from sources distributed nationally and includes scholarships, grants, internships, fellowships, and career opportunities as well as announcements for conferences, workshops and symposia.

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  Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.  
 

Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 of Vicki Lockard and Paul Barry.

 

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