Canku Ota logo

Canku Ota
(Many Paths)
An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

Canku Ota logo

 
March 2021 - Volume 19 Number 3
 
 
pictograph divider
 
 
"Wáa sá iyatee?"
The Tlingit Greeting
How are you?
 
 


Mexican Grey Wolf Family

 
 
"Ziinsibaakwadooke-giizis"
Sugar Making Moon
Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe)
 
 
pictograph divider
 
"Grown men can learn from very little children for the hearts of the little children are pure. Therefore, the Great Spirit may show to them many things which older people miss."
~Black Elk, Oglala Lakota Sioux (1863-1950)~
 
pictograph divider
 

We Salute
Wes Studi

“Wes Studi has one of the screen’s most arresting faces — jutting and creased and anchored with the kind of penetrating eyes that insist you match their gaze. Lesser directors like to use his face as a blunt symbol of the Native American experience, as a mask of nobility, of suffering, of pain that’s unknowable only because no one has asked the man wearing it. In the right movie, though, Studi doesn’t just play with a character’s facade; he peels its layers. A master of expressive opacity, he shows you the mask and what lies beneath, both the thinking and the feeling.”
Read More Button
pictograph divider
Our Featured Artist: Honoring Students

Nunavik-born Throat Singer Showcases Inuit Culture On TikTok

Just under year ago, Shina Novalinga posted her first video of her throat singing with her mother on TikTok. Now, over 1.6 million people worldwide watch the 22-year-old's videos about Inuit culture.

Novalinga, who started throat singing around the age of seven after moving to Montreal, said her account took off after her mother, Caroline, had the idea to post a video of them singing together.
 

Oklahoma Middle Schoolers' Work Lifts Off Into Outer Space

As sixth graders, Citizen Potawatomi Nation tribal member Addison Taylor and her science partner Mayzie Burke won the chance to send their experiment to the International Space Station. The two became friends after teaming up in class at Summit Christian Academy in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

Their STEAM teacher Stephanie Bradley focuses on curriculum that brings together science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics.
Read More
 
Read More
Our Featured Story: First Person History:

Deb Haaland Confirmed As 1st Native American Interior Secretary

Deb Haaland, a member of New Mexico's Laguna Pueblo, has become the first Native American Cabinet secretary in U.S. history.

The Senate voted 51-40 Monday to confirm the Democratic congresswoman to lead the Interior Department, an agency that will play a crucial role in the Biden administration's ambitious efforts to combat climate change and conserve nature.
 

A New Chahta Homeland:
A History by the Decade, 1840-1850

Over the next year and a half, Iti Fabvssa is running a series that covers Oklahoma Choctaw history. By examining each decade since the Choctaw government arrived in our new homelands using Choctaw-created documents, we will get a better understanding of Choctaw ancestors’ experiences and how they made decisions that have led us into the present. This month, we will be covering 1840-1850, a period when Choctaws dealt with the complications of incorporating Chickasaws into their territory, two new constitutions and the expansion of its
economy and school system.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
News and Views Banner
Living Traditions Living Traditions

How All My Relations, A Native Art Gallery, Navigated 2020

Well, we closed our gallery in March. I think everybody was like, "OK, we'll be closed for three weeks to slow the spread." We had an exhibition that was going on and the three weeks just kept going and going and then the [George Floyd] uprising happened and we ended up having to very quickly remove the artwork and then the gallery shifted into a response site for AIM (American Indian Movement) patrol and community folks protecting the businesses on Franklin Avenue and the gallery.
 

Amid COVID-19, A Minnesota Organization Develops A DIY Will For Native Americans

As statistics show Native Americans dying from COVID-19 at nearly twice the rate of white people, a Little Canada-based nonprofit has developed a way for those who own tribal lands to write a do-it-yourself will, free of charge.

Created by the Minnesota-based Indian Land Tenure Foundation along with other Indian legal services groups, the organization’s “Will-in-a-Box” offers an easy way for Native American landowners in three states — Minnesota, Montana and Oklahoma — to ensure their lands stays in the hands of Native people.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Living Traditions Our Heritage

Natural, Sweet Gifts Of The Maple Sugar Moon

The plink plink, plink plink of maple sap dripping into metal buckets every spring sings a sweet song to Barbara Wall's ears.

"It's just one of those feelings, you know?" Wall asked. "After a long winter, you've got the warm sun on your face, and you can hear the sap drip into the buckets. It just makes me want to dance."
 

How Ancient DNA Unearths Corn's A-maize-ing History

In the early 2000s, archeologists began excavating a rock shelter in the highlands of southwestern Honduras that stored thousands of maize cobs and other plant remains from up to 11,000 years ago. Scientists use these dried plants to learn about the diets, land-use and trading patterns of ancient communities.

After years of excavations, radiocarbon dating and more traditional archaeological studies, researchers are now turning to ancient DNA to provide more detail to their insights than has ever before been possible.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Living Gifts Living Gifts

Generous Colorado Landowner Returns Ancestral Land To Tribe

A Colorado landowner was inspired to return his land to Native Americans three years after purchasing it and being “haunted” by the “spirits” of its “rightful owners”/guardians.

When artist and plumber Rich Snyder purchased a few acres of land on Wild Horse Mesa in 2015, he had no idea what he’d find there.

He was just looking for inexpensive land to get off grid, build a homestead, and free himself from civilized life.
 

College Of Menominee Nation Gifted 35-Acre Public Garden

A Wisconsin couple's interest in horticulture and environmental education has inspired a unique and significant gift to the College of Menominee Nation (CMN). Andrew and Sharon Gleisner deeded to CMN the 35-acre garden that had been their personal project since 1975.

After extensive restoration and planting on the former farmland, the Gleisners opened the tract to the public in 2000 as Arbor View Gardens. Its botanical array features many varieties of wildflowers and other flowering plants, the state's largest collection of woody plants, outdoor art installations, and facilities for educational and social events.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph ider
Our Heritage Our Heritage

There Are Many Versions Of The Tlingit 'Raven' Story, But Its Truth And Hopeful Message Are Universal

ONE DAY, MY SON asked me, "How do we know if history is true?" He was 9 years old at the time, and his question shocked me. I explained to him that there are those who remember what happened, there is the evidence of what happened, and there are those who write it down. I told him that if enough of the stories match, then we all agree — that is what happened. I reminded him that this is how it "easily" works when the written word is the documentation for history, and that when it comes to Native history, we have to get the story right every time we tell it.
 

Tens Of Thousands Of 12,000-Year-Old Rock Paintings Found In Colombia

Toward the end of the last Ice Age, prehistoric artists painted tens of thousands of images—including depictions of mastodons, giant sloths and other now-extinct animals—on cliff walls in the Amazon rainforest, reports Dalya Alberge for the Guardian. Archaeologists found the first of the enormous set of images in 2017 but kept the trove secret while continuing work and preparing a television series on the discovery.

A British-Colombian research team funded by the European Research Council spotted the paintings stretched across eight miles of cliffs in the Serranía de la Lindosa, which is part of the Colombian Amazon. The red-ocher art features fish, lizards, birds, geometric patterns and humans, including people dancing.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Our Heritage Our Heritage

This Little-Known Native American Society Was Once As Powerful As The Aztecs And Incas

Shell cups carved with mythical beings. Large effigy pipes. Beaded baskets. These are among the archaeologically significant objects excavated from the Spiro Mounds. Often overlooked, this Native American site in the midwestern U.S. is among the greatest sources of Mississippian Native American artifacts ever discovered.

Located on the Oklahoma and Arkansas border, the Spiro Mounds were part of a city complex populated from 800 to 1450 A.D. At its peak, it supported a population of some 10,000 people.
 

Archaeologists Unearth 600-Year-Old Golden Eagle Sculpture At Aztec Temple

Archaeologists conducting excavations at the Templo Mayor, or Great Temple, in Mexico City (once home to the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán) have discovered a 600-year-old sculpture of a golden eagle, reports Ángela Reyes for CNN en Español.

Led by Rodolfo Aguilar Tapia of Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), researchers from the Templo Mayor Project unearthed the sculpture last February. The eagle—carved out of tezontle, a reddish volcanic rock commonly used in both pre-Hispanic and modern Mexico—measures 41.7 by 27.6 inches, making it the largest bas-relief (or low relief) work found at the pyramid-shaped temple to date.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Our Heritage Our Heritage

Invaders Nearly Wiped Out Caribbean's First People Long Before Spanish Came, DNA Reveals

SPANNING A MILLION square miles and dotted with more than 700 islands, the Caribbean Sea was one of the last places colonized by Native Americans as they explored and settled North and South America. Archaeologists have long struggled to pinpoint the origins and movements of those intrepid seafarers. Now, thanks to genetic material gleaned from the bones of ancient Caribbean residents, the invisible history of this tropical archipelago is coming to light.
 

Native American Tribal Nation Mini- Lesson: The Wampanoag

The Wampanoag people's traditional lands are on the North Eastern coast of the United States. The map above shows their lands in green. There are 10 nations within the Wampanoag culture. Aquinnah, Chappaquiddick, Nantucket, Nauset, Mashpee, Patuxet, Pokanoket, Pocasset, Herring Pond, and Assonet.

The Wampanoag people are fishing people!

The men often traveled north and south along the eastern coast to fish and whale hunt.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Living Traditions   Living Traditions

Culture of America' Features Oneida Beader, Ojibwe Canoe Builder

The National Endowment for the Arts, in partnership with the National Council for the Traditional Arts, will be honoring their latest 2020 National Heritage Fellows with a virtual event open to the public on Thursday, 8 p.m. ET (Mar 4 - ed).

Among the recipients are Karen Ann Hoffman, Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, a Haudenosaunee Raised Beadworker from Stevens Point, Wisconsin, and Wayne Valliere, Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe, a birchbark canoe builder from Waaswaaganing, Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin.
 

The Tribal Coalition Fighting To Save Monarch Butterflies

Seventeen years ago, Jane Breckinridge came home. A citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation with a great-grandmother who was Euchee, Breckinridge had left Oklahoma after high school to attend Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, where she decided to stay after graduation. Some two decades later, she’d secured a good-paying job in publishing, working as a vice president on the business side of a magazine. She had a nice house in a pleasant neighborhood, an office in a shiny downtown Minneapolis building complete with a heated parking spot in the basement garage—the works. “And then I really just sort of chucked it all away to come live at the end of a dirt road,” she said with a laugh.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Living Traditions  

How The All-Native Writers' Room For Netflix's 'Spirit Rangers' Was Assembled

Half Mexican and half Chumash, showrunner Karissa Valencia grew up "torn" between modern life and Native culture. That meant attending pop music festivals and using cell phones, while also going to sweat lodges, powwows and ceremonies important to her family's tribe, who live on a reservation in the Santa Ynez Valley in Santa Barbara.
 

Tribal Communities Set To Receive Big New Infusion Of Aid

Washington — After a year that provided stark new evidence of how racial inequities and a lack of federal funding had left tribal communities and Indigenous people especially vulnerable to crises like the pandemic, President Biden and Democrats in Congress are seeking to address those longstanding issues with a huge infusion of federal aid.
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
In Every Issue Banner
About This Issue's Greeting - "Wa s iyatee?"
"How are you?" is "Wa s iyatee?" in Tlingit. That is pronounced similar to "wah sah ee-yah-te." But that is not generally used as a greeting. Modern Tlingit people sometimes greet each other with "Yak'i yagiyee" which literally means "good day."
Nature's Beauty:
Mexican Grey Wolf
 
This Issue's
Favorite Web sites
 
A Story To Share:
How the Indians Obtained Dogs
Read More
 
Read More
 
Read More
pictograph divider
Home ButtonFront Page ButtonArchives ButtonOur Awards ButtonAbout Us Button
Kids Page ButtonColoring Book ButtonCool Kids ButtonGuest Book ButtonEmail Us Button
 
pictograph divider
 
 
Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107.
 
 
Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000 - 2021 of Vicki Williams Barry and Paul Barry.
 

Canku Ota logo

 

Canku Ota logo

The "Canku Ota - A Newsletter Celebrating Native America" web site and its design is the
Copyright © 1999- 2021 of Paul C. Barry.
All Rights Reserved.
Thank You

Valid HTML 4.01!